Make your own free website on Tripod.com
POWMIAs IDENTIFIED
Index
mainindex.html
Page Two
Page Three
Page Four
Page Five
Page Six
Page Seven
POW/MIAs
POWMIAs IDENTIFIED
Page Eight
Rant & Rave Page
Banner Page

This is a 2-column page.

Enter subhead content here

Missing WWII Servicemen are Identified
            The Defense POW/Missing Personnel (DPMO) announced today that three servicemen missing in action from World War II have been identified and are being returned to their families for burial with full military honors.
 
            The three are 2nd Lt. Robert H. Cameron of Elkhart, Ind.; Cpl. George E. Cunningham of Rich Hill, N.Y., all U.S. Army Air Forces; and Capt. Vladimir M. Sasko, Chicago, U.S. Army Medical Corps.  Cameron will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery near Washington, D.C., on Friday.  Sasko was buried in December in Chicago, and final arrangements for Cunningham have yet to be confirmed.
 
            On Dec. 10, 1944, a C-47 crewed by Cameron and Cunningham took off from Dobudura, New Guinea, on a cargo flight to Hollandia with three passengers aboard, including Sasko.  Forty minutes into the flight the crew radioed a request for weather information.  Another pilot in the area replied that the weather was bad, saying he was headed out to sea to avoid it.  After that, there was no further contact with the Cameron crew.  Search teams in the area from the Royal Australian Air Force were unsuccessful in finding the crash site.
 
            In 1979 and 1980, search and recovery teams from the U.S. Army’s Central I dentification Laboratory, Hawaii (CILHI) found the site and recovered remains subsequently identified by CILHI scientists as those of 2nd Lt. Stanley D. Campbell of Pioche, Nev., and Cpl. Carl A. Drain, hometown unknown.
 
            In October and November 2004 a team from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) – CILHI’s successor organization – excavated the site in Morobe Province, Papua New Guinea, where they recovered human remains and personal effects of the remaining airmen.
 
            JPAC scientists and Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory specialists used mitochondrial DNA as one of the forensic tools to help identify the remains.  Laboratory analysis of dental remains also confirmed their identification.
 
          For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO website and http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call (703) 699-1169.

1501.gif

By Mary Ann Reitano | Published  06/16/2006 | POW/MIA | Rating:
Mary Ann Reitano
Mary Ann Reitano is a cousin of an MIA Marine. 

View all articles by Mary Ann Reitano
POW/MIA Flag Under Attack

POW/MIA Flag Under Attack

 

In recent weeks there have been more than a subtle number of op-ed pieces in some major newspapers like the Boston-Globe and even, believe it or not, in the Marine Corps Times (MCT) attacking the POW/MIA Flag.  It is painstakingly clear that these writers have no real understanding of the inner workings of this issue, have no personal reference when attempting to write their commentaries, nor have then made attempts to do so.   Each of these men, James Carroll at the Boston Globe and Robert Dorr the op-ed contributor in the MCT, made no attempt to ask their questions to those that still feel this flag means something and has a symbolism that will linger far into the next century.

 

Carroll made the argument that many men were listed as MIA by surviving comrades wanting to help families of the fallen to guarantee salary payments.  He gave no supporting evidence for this assumption but at the same time one would think that the emotional turmoil of not having closure as well as the constant question of where they might be and their possible suffering would out weigh any financial benefit.  He omitted the fact that in 1980, after botching up the post-war package with Vietnam, the US government began declaring each of these men “presumed dead” and ending their salaries and benefits for their families. Carroll’s position is interesting in the fact that his father served as the head of the Defense Intelligence Agency office responsible for POW/MIA investigations in the year following Vietnam.  He may well have a personal reason for wanting to see this flag disappear that goes far beyond his political views. The mishandling of POW/MIA cases in the early years is the reason this issue is still being fought today.

 

I am forced to recall a statement made by former NH Senator Bob Smith when, in response to a question about the lack of openness on the part of our own government in this issue, said, “Truth has a way of healing a nation.”  What profound words from someone who truly does know something about this issue and has taken the time to meet with family members of the missing and understand the difficulties we are faced with in this drawn-out battle for the truth. 

 

 Dorr on the other hand claims that the POW/MIA Flag is “out-of-date imagery” and “counterproductive” and believes it should be retired.  Again, Dorr shows his need for education on the POW/MIA issue as he seems to have forgotten that we have two modern day POWs that have still not been accounted for; Navy pilot Scott Speicher from Gulf War I and Ohio Army Reservist Keith “Matthew” Maupin who was captured north of Baghdad in April of 2004.  Would either of these two writers dare to present their cases to the Maupin Family and tell them that their fight to bring their son home was “counterproductive”?  With an American soldier missing just over two years, how can one consider this flag out-dated?  It is as real and forceful today as it was in 1971 when the National League of POW/MIA Families introduced it to our nation. 

 

Here is an excerpt from a response to the Dorr piece that we written just a few days ago;

I must strongly disagree with Mr. Dorr’s statement that this flag has served its purpose and should be retired.  Until every last clue is uncovered, until every last document is made public, until every last possible American is brought home to be buried in the soil he so selflessly gave his life for, only then shall we consider retiring this flag.   Until that glorious day when they have all come home, this flag will fly and it will have meaning for those of us willing to look outside ourselves and see that doing justice for the fallen is more than doing “good” it is doing what it right.  I would like to leave you all with a quote that is seen on the walls of many schools around our nation; “What is popular isn’t always right and what is right isn’t always popular.”  We in the POW/MIA Community, thankfully, belong in the latter. “

 

If I may be so bold as to say that what each of these men lack is a sense of honor, a sense of pride.  They are, to say the very least, detached from the heart of this issue, which is, simply put, the memory of those who never came home.  One need only spend an afternoon at any of the war memorials in our nation’s capital and watch the raw emotion of the comrades and family members as they do the only thing that can do – remember. 

 

On a personal note, I would like to honor my 2nd cousin, Cpl. Gregory J. Harris who was captured 40 years ago, on 12 June, 1966 in the Mo Duc sub-sector of Quang Ngai Province in South Vietnam.   He was last seen alive being lead away into the jungle by two VC.  He was first listed as captured yet when he never appeared in the POW prison system his classification was changed to MIA.  Through those brave Marines that served with him with HQ 3/11 at Chu Lai I have a deeper understand of the words “honor” and “pride”.  I am sure they would be happy to give Mr. Carroll and Mr. Dorr a few lessons in these characteristics, as they are strong examples of both.

 

Semper Fidelis,

Mary Ann Reitano

 

This issue’s Marine to remember: 

Capt. Francis Visconti, pilot of a UH34D helicopter lost during a combat mission on 22 November, 1965.  His wife Jan, even from her wheel chair, continues to fight for his accounting.

 

http://www.pownetwork.org/bios/v/v005.htm

Enter supporting content here

GoodSearch logo Our Sites Sponser the Wounded Warrior Project. Use GoodSearch and benefit them too!

1501.gif

banner2.jpg

FREE ACCOUNTS TO ALL MILITARY FAMILIES, TROOPS, FRIENDS, JUST EMAIL ARMAN @ PLAYERSCLUB@HELLOWORLD.COM AND HE'LL SET YOU UP FOR FREE!!

1501.gif

sosbana.gif

DEVIL DOG MARINES BLOGSPOT WITH LIL JOSH WRIGHT

1501.gif

mvm.jpg

MILLION VETERAN MARCH WITH JAMES T. NORTH

1501.gif

vetshonorbanner2.gif

1501.gif

e.gif

1501.gif

ohiopowmiabanner.jpg

1501.gif

racecar1.gif

1501.gif

EMAIL POWMIA ANGEL

1501.gif

If you would like to join my POWMIA AWARENESS TOP SITES list, please click the banner below to be taken to the sign up process.  Just follow the easy step by step process, upload your website's banner, enter one of the voting html codes onto your website, and you're all set to go!  We run a 6 month contest.  Jan. thru June; June thru Dec.

powmiaawareness.gif

1501.gif

BRINGING FORTH THE POWMIA AWARENESS THAT HAS ESCAPED THE AMERICAN MINDS AND HEARTS.............UNTIL NOW!


TopSites

POW/MIA Ring

This POW/MIA Ring site
is owned by POWMIA ANGEL Site ID#1123

[ Next | Previous | Skip | Random Site ]
[ List Sites | Stats | MessageBoard | Join ]

Proud Member of the POW/MIA Freedom Fighters.
Get a POW/MIA Honor Page of your own.

Animations, Templates and Web Designs